Ant Nest structure(vía BioOne Online Journals - The nest architecture of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius)
NASA image acquired April 18 - October 23, 2012
This new image of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East at night is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite in April and October 2012. The new data was mapped over existing Blue Marble imagery of Earth to provide a realistic view of the planet.
The nighttime view was made possible by the new satellite’s “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as gas flares, auroras, wildfires, city lights, and reflected moonlight. In this case, auroras, fires, and other stray light have been removed to emphasize the city lights.
“Night time imagery provides an intuitively graspable view of our planet,” says William Stefanov, senior remote sensing scientist for the International Space Station program office. “They provide a fairly straightforward means to map urban versus rural areas, and to show where the major population centers are and where they are not.”
Named for satellite meteorology pioneer Verner Suomi, NPP flies over any given point on Earth’s surface twice each day at roughly 1:30 a.m. and p.m. The polar-orbiting satellite flies 824 kilometers (512 miles) above the surface, sending its data once per orbit to a ground station in Svalbard, Norway, and continuously to local direct broadcast users distributed around the world. The mission is managed by NASA with operational support from NOAA and its Joint Polar Satellite System, which manages the satellite’s ground system.
NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Suomi NPP VIIRS data provided courtesy of Chris Elvidge (NOAA National Geophysical Data Center). Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA, and the Department of Defense. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.
Instrument: Suomi NPP - VIIRS
Credit: NASA Earth Observatory
Click here to view all of the Earth at Night 2012 images
Click here to read more about this image
NASA image use policy.
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.
Black Marble - Africa, Europe, and the Middle East (por NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

NASA image acquired April 18 - October 23, 2012

This new image of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East at night is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite in April and October 2012. The new data was mapped over existing Blue Marble imagery of Earth to provide a realistic view of the planet.

The nighttime view was made possible by the new satellite’s “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as gas flares, auroras, wildfires, city lights, and reflected moonlight. In this case, auroras, fires, and other stray light have been removed to emphasize the city lights.

“Night time imagery provides an intuitively graspable view of our planet,” says William Stefanov, senior remote sensing scientist for the International Space Station program office. “They provide a fairly straightforward means to map urban versus rural areas, and to show where the major population centers are and where they are not.”

Named for satellite meteorology pioneer Verner Suomi, NPP flies over any given point on Earth’s surface twice each day at roughly 1:30 a.m. and p.m. The polar-orbiting satellite flies 824 kilometers (512 miles) above the surface, sending its data once per orbit to a ground station in Svalbard, Norway, and continuously to local direct broadcast users distributed around the world. The mission is managed by NASA with operational support from NOAA and its Joint Polar Satellite System, which manages the satellite’s ground system.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Suomi NPP VIIRS data provided courtesy of Chris Elvidge (NOAA National Geophysical Data Center). Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA, and the Department of Defense. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.

Instrument: Suomi NPP - VIIRS

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

Click here to view all of the Earth at Night 2012 images

Click here to read more about this image

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

Black Marble - Africa, Europe, and the Middle East (por NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

Mapa de los bosques que quedan en España elaborado por WWF.

Mapa de los bosques que quedan en España elaborado por WWF.

Routing 30,000 randomly-chosen trips through the paths suggested by 10,000 randomly-chosen geotags. These are perhaps the most interesting routes between the endpoints of the trips, even if not necessarily the most likely.
Data from the Twitter streaming API, August, 2011. Base map from OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA.
Paths through Madrid (por Eric Fischer)

Routing 30,000 randomly-chosen trips through the paths suggested by 10,000 randomly-chosen geotags. These are perhaps the most interesting routes between the endpoints of the trips, even if not necessarily the most likely.

Data from the Twitter streaming API, August, 2011. Base map from OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA.

Paths through Madrid (por Eric Fischer)

Routing 30,000 randomly-chosen trips through the paths suggested by 10,000 randomly-chosen geotags. These are perhaps the most interesting routes between the endpoints of the trips, even if not necessarily the most likely.
Data from the Twitter streaming API, August, 2011. Base map from OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA.
Paths through Barcelona (por Eric Fischer)

Routing 30,000 randomly-chosen trips through the paths suggested by 10,000 randomly-chosen geotags. These are perhaps the most interesting routes between the endpoints of the trips, even if not necessarily the most likely.

Data from the Twitter streaming API, August, 2011. Base map from OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA.

Paths through Barcelona (por Eric Fischer)

popchartlab:

Plan your European beer-vacation with The Breweries of Europe.
The world’s most comprehensive mapping of the breweries and abbeys of the European continent, featuring nearly 1,000 breweries — from craft to macro and everything in between.

popchartlab:

Plan your European beer-vacation with The Breweries of Europe.

The world’s most comprehensive mapping of the breweries and abbeys of the European continent, featuring nearly 1,000 breweries — from craft to macro and everything in between.

-

Volumen de búsquedas en todo el mundo visualizado en el globo terráqueo WebGL.

WebGL Globe

cartolleria:

Squirrel HighwaysNervous squirrels, afraid of an attack on the ground, use the phone and television cables as highways wherever the tree canopy’s broken. Birds rest on the power lines.Image and caption copyrighted Denis Wood & Siglio Press reproduced with permission. (via Brain Pickings | Kirstin Butler)

cartolleria:

Squirrel Highways
Nervous squirrels, afraid of an attack on the ground, use the phone and television cables as highways wherever the tree canopy’s broken. Birds rest on the power lines.
Image and caption copyrighted Denis Wood & Siglio Press reproduced with permission. (via Brain Pickings | Kirstin Butler)

(vía feltron)

poptech:

Unfolding the Earth: myriahedral projections

Mapping the earth is a classic problem. For thousands of years cartographers, mathematicians, and inventors have come up with methods to map the curved surface of the earth to a flat plane. The main problem is that you cannot do this perfectly, such that both the shape and size of the surface are depicted properly everywhere. This has intrigued me for a long time. Why not just take a map of a small part of the earth, which is almost perfect, glue neighboring maps to it, and repeat this until the whole earth is shown? Of course you get interrupts, but does this matter? What does such a map look like? To check this out, we developed myriahedral projections.

(via scipsy)

(vía proofmathisbeautiful)

What if Google Maps went live… (by flux/S)

2/10/2012 — MUST SEE ! 2011 earthquakes WORLDWIDE plotted and animated (with sound intensity) ! (by dutchsinse)

Giant Globe OLED Display Geo-Cosmos (by tokyotek)

Submarine internet cable map 2012

Submarine internet cable map 2012

[Image: New York Harbor, mapped in 1966, courtesy of NOAA].
(via BLDGBLOG: Submarine City)

[Image: New York Harbor, mapped in 1966, courtesy of NOAA].

(via BLDGBLOG: Submarine City)