A Boy And His Atom: The World’s Smallest Movie (por IBM)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

As a flapping object moves through a fluid, many patterns of vortices can form in its wake. The familiar von Karman vortex street, so often seen in clouds or behind cylinders, is only the beginning. In the photo above, a symmetric foil flaps in a vertical soap film; as the amplitude and frequency of the oscillation varies, the wake patterns it produces change dramatically.  From left to right, a) a von Karman wake; b) an inverted von Karman wake; c) a 2P wake, in which two vortex pairs are shed with each cycle; d) a 2P+2S wake, in which two vortex pairs and two single vortices are shed per cycle; e) a 4P wake; and f) a 4P+2S wake. See some of these flows in action in these videos. (Photo credit: T. Schnipper et al.)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

As a flapping object moves through a fluid, many patterns of vortices can form in its wake. The familiar von Karman vortex street, so often seen in clouds or behind cylinders, is only the beginning. In the photo above, a symmetric foil flaps in a vertical soap film; as the amplitude and frequency of the oscillation varies, the wake patterns it produces change dramatically.  From left to right, a) a von Karman wake; b) an inverted von Karman wake; c) a 2P wake, in which two vortex pairs are shed with each cycle; d) a 2P+2S wake, in which two vortex pairs and two single vortices are shed per cycle; e) a 4P wake; and f) a 4P+2S wake. See some of these flows in action in these videos. (Photo credit: T. Schnipper et al.)

(vía proofmathisbeautiful)

(vía TECTÓNICAblog » Satélite Echo I)
(vía El cabezón de Mercator - La Cartoteca)
In 1927, at the Fifth Solvay International Conference on Electrons and Photons, 29 of the most brilliant minds in physics (17 of them were or later became Nobel Prize winners) got together and took the iconic photo above.
Fast forward 85 years to today, when Sanna Dullway (redditor mygrapefruit) added color to the black and white photo. 
(vía Twenty-nine of history’s most iconic scientists in one photograph - now in color!)

In 1927, at the Fifth Solvay International Conference on Electrons and Photons, 29 of the most brilliant minds in physics (17 of them were or later became Nobel Prize winners) got together and took the iconic photo above.

Fast forward 85 years to today, when Sanna Dullway (redditor mygrapefruit) added color to the black and white photo. 

(vía Twenty-nine of history’s most iconic scientists in one photograph - now in color!)

(Fuente: newhousebooks, vía otakugangsta)

jessicafurseth:

Radical idealist, technology futurist, renaissance man, artist and dreamer: My piece on the Buckminster Fuller exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Utopian Impulse, is in Whitehot Magazine.
“If humanity does not opt for integrity we are through completely. It is absolutely touch and go. Each one of us could make the difference.” [BF]

jessicafurseth:

Radical idealist, technology futurist, renaissance man, artist and dreamer: My piece on the Buckminster Fuller exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Utopian Impulse, is in Whitehot Magazine.

If humanity does not opt for integrity we are through completely. It is absolutely touch and go. Each one of us could make the difference.” [BF]

(vía buckminster-fuller)

Super Kamiokande Neutrino detector


erasorhed
:

fou-a-lier:

The Super Kamiokande (Kamioka Neutrino Detection Experiment) is a neutrino observatory located under Mount Kamioka in Japan. It is designed to observe solar and atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from supernovae, and aims to search for proton decay. It is a cylindrical structure measuring about 40 m tall and 40 m across, is covered in over 11,000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), and filled with 50,000 tons of pure water.

Neutrinos weakly interact with other particles, making it extremely difficult to detect them and observe their properties; in fact, they cannot be directed detected at all. Detectors are built underground to isolate it from other radiation. When a neutrino passes through the Super-K’s water tank, it will sometimes (hopefully) collide with a quark, causing it to change into a charged lepton (electron, muon, or tau). The very short version of what happens next is that the lepton will travel faster than the speed of light in water (not in vacuum), polarizing the water molecules; when they return to their ground state, Cherenkov radiation is emitted in a flash of light, which the PMTs detect. The last image is of a Cherenkov ring by an electron created from a neutrino collision in the Super-K, in perspective view.

Oooooh this reminds me of House of Leaves!

(vía proofmathisbeautiful)

It was not a dream. It happened.

inothernews:

MOONER   Neil Armstrong, as photographed by Buzz Aldrin, working near the Eagle lunar lander after landing on July 20, 1969.  (Photo: Aldrin / NASA via The New York Times)

inothernews:

MOONER   Neil Armstrong, as photographed by Buzz Aldrin, working near the Eagle lunar lander after landing on July 20, 1969.  (Photo: Aldrin / NASA via The New York Times)

(vía itsfullofstars)

(via xkcd: Exoplanets)
parametricworld:

architectural forest

parametricworld:

architectural forest

(vía proofmathisbeautiful)

(via In Focus - The Fantastic Machine That Found the Higgs Boson - The Atlantic)
The huge ATLAS Toroid Magnet End-Cap A is transported between building 180 to ATLAS point 1 on May 29, 2007. (Claudia Marcelloni/© 2012 CERN) (via In Focus - The Fantastic Machine That Found the Higgs Boson - The Atlantic)

The huge ATLAS Toroid Magnet End-Cap A is transported between building 180 to ATLAS point 1 on May 29, 2007. (Claudia Marcelloni/© 2012 CERN) (via In Focus - The Fantastic Machine That Found the Higgs Boson - The Atlantic)